Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Introduction to Spring

Spring Web Services (Spring-WS) is a product of the Spring community focused on creating document-driven Web services. Spring Web Services aims to facilitate contract-first SOAP service development, allowing for the creation of flexible web services using one of the many ways to manipulate XML payloads. The product is based on Spring itself, which means you can use the Spring concepts such as dependency injection as an integral part of your Web service.

People use Spring-WS for many reasons, but most are drawn to it after finding alternative SOAP stacks lacking when it comes to following Web service best practices. Spring-WS makes the best practice an easy practice. This includes practices such as the WS-I basic profile, Contract-First development, and having a loose coupling between contract and implementation. The other key features of Spring Web services are:


Hibernate is a powerful, high performance object/relational persistence and query service. Hibernate lets you develop persistent classes following object-oriented idiom - including association, inheritance, polymorphism, composition, and collections. Hibernate allows you to express queries in its own portable SQL extension (HQL), as well as in native SQL, or with an object-oriented Criteria and Example API.


Shad Gregory Moss (born March 9, 1987), better known by his stage name Bow Wow (formerly Lil' Bow Wow), is an American rapper, actor, and music producer. He released his debut album Beware of Dog at age 13, then under the stage name Lil' Bow Wow, which he carried until his 2003 album Unleashed, under simply Bow Wow. Three more albums followed, Wanted in 2005, The Price of Fame in 2006 and New Jack City II in 2009. In 2007, he released the collaboration album Face Off with Omarion.[1]

Tuesday, March 31, 2009

A History of "Open Source"

I'd lik 2 tel u a story abt wht everyone cls "open source" software. There's a lot f heros, a wild-eyed visionary (who might be a madman), bt no villians. @ least not yet.

It's a pretty long story, nd I'm only telling u a few of the parts I kno.

Dis story started almost twenty yrs ago, nd it isn't over yet.

Richard Stallman

In da early 80's, a programmer named Richard Stallman wrked 4 MIT. He spent huge amounts of tim wrking on the original Emacs, an operating system called ITS, and the exceedingly cool LISP machines.

Stallman wrote good software. His programs were clever--they were frequently built around a few good ideas that made everything else easy.

But Stallman was also an ideologue. His software came with instructions: Share this code with your fellow users. Learn from it. Improve upon it. And when you're done, please give something back to the community.

To Stallman, this sharing was a moral principle. And as it turned out, Stallman would happily turn down money, fame and glory in the name of his moral principles.

You can read the whole story in Levy's excellent (but out-of-print) book, Hackers: Heros of the Computer Revolution.

This is my first blog writing script.